CONTEMPT OF COURT: WHAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW

Contempt of court occurs when a court issues an order requiring that a person (or company) do something, and that person disobeys the court order.  The injured or aggrieved party requests that the court find that person in contempt and take action to ensure compliance with the order. In other words, once the court issues a ruling, so long as that ruling is in effect, anyone who is ordered to do something in the order must do it, or the court may find them in contempt.

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PARENTING PLANS: QUESTIONS TO ASK BEFORE YOU DEVELOP A SCHEDULE

Last week we looked at how to create a parenting plan to divide your decision making after divorce. Establishing details and processes for decision making is the foundation of a terrific parenting plan.   Create a plan with the help of an experienced mediator, family counselor, or collaborative attorney to draft a strong agreement-- built to withstand a lot of wear of tear!  Next, you’ll develop the second part of your parenting plan, a schedule outlining what nights your child is sleeping at each house—or “allocation of custodial responsibility.” 

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TOP FIVE WAYS TO FIND A MEDIATOR

When you have a dispute with someone that lands you in court, chances are sooner or later you will attend mediation.  In many states, such as West Virginia, mediation is required in all circuit court civil cases, and in most custody cases.  If the parties have not voluntarily participated in mediation, the courts usually order them to mediation.  The same general rules apply in Virginia and the District of Columbia.  You don't have to wait for a court to order you to attend mediation.  You can select your own mediator and discover the benefits of early mediation.

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